Spice to See Ya, To See Ya…

Earlier this week a 5 year old girl made the news after her father told of how she’d fallen foul of local government enforcers in Tower Hamlets…

A five-year-old girl was left in tears after being fined £150 for running a stall selling cups of homemade lemonade to passersby.

The schoolgirl was accused of trading without a licence by a council enforcement officer last Saturday, her father, Andre Spicer, said. The officer issued a fixed penalty notice demanding the sum – or £90 if the family agreed to pay promptly.

“She was very upset and had to watch Brave a few times to calm down,” he said.

After public outcry, the council rescinded the fine…

A Tower Hamlets council spokesperson said: “We are very sorry that this has happened. We expect our enforcement officers to show common sense, and to use their powers sensibly. This clearly did not happen.

“The fine will be cancelled immediately and we have contacted Prof Spicer and his daughter to apologise.”

And perhaps with all the recent acid incidents, there is an impetus for ‘inadequate busybodies’ to crack down indiscriminately

Across the Atlantic another, more famous, Spicer made an announcement yesterday

White House press secretary Sean Spicer has moved to minimise talk of divisions within the Trump administration after announcing his resignation.

Mr Spicer is reportedly stepping down because he is unhappy with President Donald Trump’s appointment of a new communications director.

But he told Fox News he had “no regrets” about his six-month stint.

Wall Street financier Anthony Scaramucci has been picked for the role that Mr Spicer had partially filled.

Of course, the former White House Press Secretary was fatally wounded early in his tenure, from a savage blow landed by a fat bottom girl…

grocer (n.)early 15c. (mid-13c. as a surname), “wholesale dealer, one who buys and sells in gross,” corrupted spelling of Anglo-French grosser, Old French grossier, from Medieval Latin grossarius “wholesaler,” literally “dealer in quantity” (source also of Spanish grosero, Italian grosseiro), from Late Latin grossus“coarse (of food), great, gross” (see gross (adj.)). Sense of “a merchant selling individual items of food” is 16c.; in Middle English this was a spicer.

As for spice…

spice (n.) c. 1200, “something added to food or drink to enhance the flavor, vegetable substance aromatic or pungent to the taste,” also “a spice used as a medication or an alchemical ingredient,” from Old French espice (Modern French épice), from Late Latin species (plural) “spices, goods, wares,” in classical Latin “kind, sort” (see species). From c. 1300 as “an aromatic spice,” also “spices as commodities;” from early 14c. as “a spice-bearing plant.” Figurative sense of “attractive or enjoyable variation” is from 13c.; that of “slight touch or trace of something” is recorded from 1530s. Meaning “specimen, sample” is from 1790. Early druggists recognized four “types” of spices: saffron, clove, cinnamon, nutmeg.

Seems like it should be 5, so to end this post, Dear Reader, a treat sent to me this week by my favourite Ginger… Have a Song 😉